Happy Holidays from Loganberry and Thank you for your Patience

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I would like to take a minute, as we are just one week out from Thanksgiving and Black Friday, to say happy holidays to all. I would also like to thank you for your patience this time of year. During the holidays the store gets very busy and i can sometimes fall a little behind in getting new posts up. What this means is that it may take up to 3 weeks for me to get your post up. I will try as hard as I can to get new posts up each week. Thank you again for your patience.

Ami and the Loganberry Books Staff

Welcome to Stump the Bookseller by Loganberry Books!

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Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!  Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course.  It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee.  Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder.  Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

Attention Stumper Magicians! Gifts Abound!!

Loganberry Books would like to thank all the Magicians, Wizards, Geniuses, and Miracle Workers out there who help solve our Book Stumpers. Without you we would never be able to reunite people with their long lost book titles.

In the spirit of the season we would like to extend a token of our appreciation to all you wonderful people. This year there are three gifts to choose from.

1) Vintage Children’s book  (titles and condition vary)
2) Advanced Reader’s Copy  (contemporary grab bag)
3) One free Stump the Bookseller posting in 2014

Please send me an email (ami@logan.com) with Stumper Magician in the subject line by January 13th. Tell me something about yourself (what do you do for a living? How many Stumpers have you solved? What do you wish would be reprinted?), and let me know which gift you would like. If you are choosing a book, please be sure to include your mailing address.

Many thanks and Happy Holidays,
Ami & the rest of the crew at Loganberry Books

196B: P.S. I Hate You (?)

I read a young adult fiction book when I was about 13, probably published in the 70s. I was certain it was called PS I Hate You, but can’t find anything on Google with that title. It was about a teen girl, possibly named Marley, who leaves a note on the kitchen table, closing with P.S. I hate you and runs away to her father in the city. While living there, she falls in love with her English teacher when he introduces her to the poem Nothing Gold Can Stay (the same poem used in The Outsiders). She is also insulted by another teacher, who calls her “plain, plump and pimply.”

196A: surviving a disaster, but not a historical fiction

I am looking for a book, I guesstimate that I read it 4-10 years ago and typically I read books that are new and currently selling in bookstores. Here is my dream-like recollection:
Theme of book is surviving a disaster, but not a historical fiction (ie, not dust bowl, depression per se) but I do feel like it was Americana rural setting maybe in 1930s-1950s? There are only 3 main characters: a mother, her teen son and a neighbor/man/stranger. The disaster has caused a shortage in gasoline and the mother/son drive to the bank and grocery store but they can’t get money from bank and there is very little food left at the grocery. They go home and have to survive. Maybe the neighbor/man kills an animal? The mother has to rely on and trust this stranger/neighbor. The mother has to trade something very valuable to a roaming salesman who is selling butter/milk. Money is worthless. The neighbor/man has a severe toothache and extracts his own tooth.

It is not a children’s book though. If you can’t find the book, can you recommend another searching source – I’m not so great with “google”.
Thank you very much for your time!

195H: Mouse picking up shiny things

I am looking for a children’s book about a mouse (rat?) who would see something pretty or shiny and pick it up. He would get distracted by the next shiny thing and put down what was in his hands and pick up the next thing. My husband thinks it’s called “Pick it, Put it” or the other way around. It was his favorite book in the early 60′s. Can you help? Thank you for trying!

195G: Children’s book with descriptive skin tones

I wish I had more information, but my girlfriend described a book that she had as a child. It was (I believe) a picture book, with various pictures of children of color and descriptions of their skin tones (like “John’s skin is the color of a penny,” stuff like that). I know it’s not a lot to go on, but if anyone remembers anything, that would be great.

195F: Child’s book about time and timekeeping (Solved)

We’d love to reconnnect with this children’s book we had from our local library, but despite extensive online searching, can find no trace of it, as cannot remember or even guess at the title.

Illustrated short children’s book from c. 1990, for readers perhaps 5 – 9. The young heroine (age 8-ish, possibly called Anna) is not good at timekeeping, and is often late for tea. She therefore observes that ‘time is [like] a monster, marching on’. She meets the clock-keeper of the town hall clock, asks him about the nature of time, and he kindly on one occasion puts the clock back about 5 minutes, so that she does not seem late home for tea. The story and pictures have a mainland European feel to it. Someone suggested it may have been set in Switzerland. It is almost certainly a translation into English, and the English has that sense of maintaining a foreign idiom.
If this resonates with anything you recall, we will be overjoyed!

195E: Uncle sends a penguin to his nephew.

Nephew receives a box in the mail from his uncle. When the boy opens the box he is surprised there is a penguin inside.
My father who was born in 1930 tells me this is one of the first books he ever read which leads me to believe the book was published in the 1930s. My father doesn’t remember much else but he always laughs when he describes the boy opening the box and finding the penguin. I would love to be able to find this book for him to read again.

195D: Black swan boy

What I remember: an elf/dwarf? sets out on a quest. He pulls a sword out of a muddy swamp,there is a monster. There is a boy/prince? who can turn into a black or white swan. At the end, there is a huge sea wall with ice/nets? Boy saves the day, ship able to pull into harbor, people cheer, flags fly.

195C: The Magic Pencil (Solved)

I’m looking for a book for my aunt. She remembers reading a story called “The Magic Pencil” to her boys (this would have been back in the 1980s and 90s), but the story is part of a larger book/anthology of stories that she can’t remember the name of. Based on the look and feel of the book, she thinks it was probably from the 1950s (though that’s just a guess). In the story, the pencil would only write if you used the magic word “please” (or something like that). Would love to find this for her for Christmas!

195B: Forgotten Book: Boy ducks wings

I’m looking for a children’s story about a boy who leaves home or is lost and is adopted by a family of ducks (or geese?). He wants to learn to fly, like the ducks do, but has no wings, so he builds wings from mud, sticks and leaves. The illustrations are in a sepia tone. My wife read this book as a girl. She is 33 years old. She doesn’t think there were words – only pictures.